03 Happy!

But what do Millennials think? Almost exactly the opposite to their elders.

Heads firmly screwed on

92% of the terms they use to describe themselves are positive. Above all, they consider themselves to be responsible. 41% of European Millennials share this opinion, compared with just 6% of over 35s. The Portuguese, Bulgarians and Spanish are the most likely to agree (58%, 49% and 48%, respectively), while the Poles, Norwegians and Slovaks are more circumspect (29%, 34% and 35%).

In the workplace

Millennials declare that they are hard working and far from idle or oblivious, which they are often accused of being. 34% are of this opinion, compared with just 7% of over 35s. On this particular theme, the differences between the countries are more pronounced. If you want to see Millennials rolling up their sleeves, look eastwards. The Romanians, Slovaks and Bulgarians do not believe they are taking it easy (54%, 49% and 46%).



In a happy place

29% of Millennials also consider themselves happy. On this topic, there are few notable differences, with similar opinions being held from one country to the next. However, the Danes (39%) are even happier with their lot than the European average, while the Italians feel the least fulfilled (16%).



Resolutely positive

In contrast to over 35s, Millennials believe that they are patient (29% vs. 2%), curious (26% vs. 8%) and peace-loving (20% vs. 5%). The Latin countries, Portugal, Italy and France, as well as Belgium, stand apart in this area.

The fact that only 15% describe themselves as idealistic (10%) provides confirmation, if ever it were needed, that they are rational and have their feet firmly on the ground. Surprisingly, Millennials in Italy seem to go slightly against the grain on this point, despite their reluctance to proclaim their happiness. Indeed, this is the country with the highest number of idealists (21%).